Acute Upper Airway Obstruction

Acute upper airway obstruction is a life-threatening emergency and requires immediate assessment and intervention with little margin for error, making it a constant challenge for clinicians. Substantial advances have been made in preventive medicine, our understanding of the pathophysiology of…

Acute Severe Hypertension

Foreword. This Journal feature begins with a case vignette highlighting a common clinical problem. Evidence supporting various strategies is then presented, followed by a review of formal guidelines, when they exist. The article ends with the author’s clinical recommendations. Stage.

Adrenal Crisis

Glucocorticoid replacement therapy, available since the 1950s, has prolonged the survival of patients with adrenal insufficiency. However, adrenal crises, which are life-threatening medical emergencies, still develop in many affected patients. Adrenal crisis appears to be increasing in frequency,…

A Diagnosis to Chew On

Foreword. In this Journal feature, information about a real patient is presented in stages (boldface type) to an expert clinician, who responds to the information by sharing relevant background and reasoning with the reader (regular type). The authors’ commentary follows.

Highlights from this issue

Diagnostic uncertainty and physician experience We commonly use chest x-ray (CXR) to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the Emergency Department. The 2015 ESCAPED study found that in patients without parenchymal infiltrates on CXR, routine thoracic CT scan was positive for

The impact of editorial policy

Editorials throughout 2018 made explicit the journal’s editorial direction. In particular, we drew readers’ attention to the process of manuscript selection1 and the purpose selection was aiming to achieve.2 Rather than being a passive filtering process, editorial selection aims to

Highlights from this issue

Reducing repeat emergency department attendance for non-urgent care: a systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions Paediatric Emergency medicine continues to evolve as a specialty around the world and with it, an increasing demand on those services, in the emergency

Taking Note

“Not so hard!” howled the man with abdominal pain, his body tense against his stretcher. His skin looked sallow under the fluorescents illuminating the crowded emergency department (ED) hallway. My fingers had barely brushed his belly. Although we’d just met,

Taking Note

“Not so hard!” howled the man with abdominal pain, his body tense against his stretcher. His skin looked sallow under the fluorescents illuminating the crowded emergency department (ED) hallway. My fingers had barely brushed his belly. Although we’d just met,

Our choices

Many scientific journals these days have taken to designating a particularly intriguing, important or extremely well done paper that appears in that month’s issue. At the EMJ, we actually have several such papers, and I was thinking that perhaps our

Highlights from this issue

All you need is nitrous We are privileged to publish a wonderful randomised controlled trial this month. Seiler et al randomised children undergoing painful procedures under sedation with 70% nitrous oxide to receive additional intranasal fentanyl or a placebo. They

In review

The end of the year is a conventional time to take stock and assess ones performance over the preceding 12-month period. Comparisons are invariably the currency of these evaluations. Both the notion of evaluation, and the use of comparisons as

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